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bill:

the year is 2046. no one has memed in 15 years since king obama the third make memeing illegal. in the dystopian suburbs of fort lauderdale, sixteen year-old Dogecoin de Grasse Sagan found a sexy fedora in an trash dumpster. he put it on and it made a sweet anime noise. he knew then he, was destined to bring memes back to this stupid idiot planet. he looked at the camera and goes “u mad, world?”

(via kismesissitudes)

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(via jethroq)

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beesmygod:

i still subscribe to the theory that kojima’s secret to looking youthful resides in some “picture of dorian gray” style magic where solid snake gets older and older for each sin kojima commits

(Source: boosmygod, via officialnyteblayde)

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(Source: tachiibanaa, via nikopetteri)

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istehlurvz:

dg9yaw5ndg9u:

glamattractions:

How eyeliner styles change your eye appearance.

Tagging for future reference

I TRIED TO EXPLAIN THIS TO SOMEONE ONCE AND THEY DIDN’T GET IT. I do this frequently with my makeup..

istehlurvz:

dg9yaw5ndg9u:

glamattractions:

How eyeliner styles change your eye appearance.

Tagging for future reference

I TRIED TO EXPLAIN THIS TO SOMEONE ONCE AND THEY DIDN’T GET IT. I do this frequently with my makeup..

(via cheekibreekiivdamke)

Tags: makeup
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wet-monsoon:

ALEX HIRSCH JUST POSTED THIS ON TWITTER AND I’M HONESTLY SO CONCERNED

(via cheekibreekiivdamke)

Tags: jojo gf
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reminder for bisexuals

lyricalred:

today is bi visibility day. as such, bisexual people will be completely visible for the next 24 hours. this is a bad day to engage in bank heists, ghost impersonations, covert operations for vague yet menacing government agencies, and other common bisexual hobbies that rely upon our powers of invisibility. 

reblog to save a life. 

(via sspsdd)

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businesswhale:

kazchester:

crossroadscastiel:

I paused the episode I was watching and I was like oh he looks so pretty I’m gonna show tumblr and then I took a picture of my tv and this happened and now I’m crying




potion seller

businesswhale:

kazchester:

crossroadscastiel:

I paused the episode I was watching and I was like oh he looks so pretty I’m gonna show tumblr and then I took a picture of my tv and this happened and now I’m crying

potion seller

(via ghostruto)

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merlerner94:

achillesfeels:

trying to get your friends to watch a show you like

image

Gentle persuasion

(via limeocelot)

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tastefullyoffensive:

This is what happens when you don’t separate your colors and whites.[via]

tastefullyoffensive:

This is what happens when you don’t separate your colors and whites.

[via]

(via cstalli)

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Photoset

the-goddamazon:

meenat:

I’m in love with indigenous characters so I’m gonna draw my fave ones and the first one is the fab Kuzco psshhh who doesn’t love Kuzco!? 

BUT HAAAAY KUZCO HAAAAAY

(via tunnaa-unnaa)

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unexplained-events:

staragus:

unexplained-events:

When Caroline Walter of Freiburg, Germany died at the age of 16, her sister, ,Selma, had a sculptor cast a life size sculpture for the gravestone - Every morning since Caroline’s funeral, a fresh flower was found tucked in the crook of the arm, and still is to this day - Nobody knows who leaves it - Every single morning! - Caroline died in 1867 - For 146 years, someone has been leaving flowers…

Caroline totes had a vampire lover.

This is by far, my favorite theory.

unexplained-events:

staragus:

unexplained-events:

When Caroline Walter of Freiburg, Germany died at the age of 16, her sister, ,Selma, had a sculptor cast a life size sculpture for the gravestone - Every morning since Caroline’s funeral, a fresh flower was found tucked in the crook of the arm, and still is to this day - Nobody knows who leaves it - Every single morning! - Caroline died in 1867 - For 146 years, someone has been leaving flowers…

Caroline totes had a vampire lover.

This is by far, my favorite theory.

(via theforumcat)

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petermorwood:

armsandarmor:

ritasv:

IMG_5399 by Geckoo76 on Flickr.
Good grief…is that a claymore??  *blink*  Not being a weapon scholar, how do you carry a sword that is taller than you are?  Don’t you dare tell me ‘very carefully’, either.  *snort*
***Thank you to David for explaining that it is a replica of a German Zweihander!

For cutting into ranks of dudes holding pikes.

The average two-hander Highland claymore (there was a Lowland version too) was about a foot shorter than the average Zweihänder, and had a typical straight-armed crossguard sloping pointwards and ending in a quatrefoil…

I photographed this case of typical Zweihänders in Basel Historisches Museum a few years ago - typical very wide straight or curved guards, sometimes with side-rings, and those distinctive secondary guards (Parierhaken - “parrying hooks”) on the blade…

The men who used these were called Doppelsöldner (“double-pay men”), which they got supposedly for the dangerous duty of fighting in the front rank against opposing pikes, meaning something like this… 

The costumes and helmets suggest these are re-enactors of Thirty Years’ or English Civil War, meaning about 80-odd years after Zweihänders were common, but it gives an idea of why double pay was an incentive. I think they earned it!
However, they may also have got “special skills” double pay once they proved they could handle the big two-handers correctly and not cause blue-on-blue incidents like: “Oops, sorry Franz, were those your fingers/kidneys/entrails? Hey, this thing’s longer than it looks…”
Looking at Renaissance fight manuals (Marozzo, Meyer, di Grassi etc.,) the technique seems not just longsword, but also partly short polearm (something echoed in the way they were carried) which suggests using really big two-handers was a more complicated business than just “hold the safe end and hit the enemy with the sharp end.”

Neither they nor claymores were ever worn on a back-scabbard. I did a Google Image search for that obscure object of desire: modern and/or movie, every single one. No period back-scabbard is displayed in a museum, and nor does any period art show one in use, because the back-scabbard is a modern Renfair/Hollywood fantasy that didn’t exist before the late 20th century.
A commonly-seen interpretation of back-carried “claymore” is the Irish Gallowglass. Google-image that and you’ll find artwork, illustrations, figurines, war-gaming figures and even otherwise-careful re-enactors (guys, please!) with back-slung scabbards. The trouble is, they all seem based on nothing further back in history than this 1980s or 1990s painting by Angus McBride for one of the Osprey series…

…and since I don’t have the book, I don’t know where he or its author based their data for the scabbard. I’m pretty sure the rest came from this 1521 drawing by Albrecht Dürer of a real Gallowglass and his kern retainers. 

The great big sword is very much there, but any sort of back-scabbard is very much not. If anyone anywhere can find solid 500-year-old evidence that such a specialised item existed, I’ll be impressed, and more than a bit surprised. It hasn’t happened yet.
Period art…

..shows…

…Zweihänders…

…carried…

…like…

…this…

Some surprisingly long swords were carried slung from the waist (including Elizabethan rapiers so long that a law was passed to restrict their length) but to date, evidence for slinging any European sword across the wearer’s back stays in the file marked hic sunt dracones…

petermorwood:

armsandarmor:

ritasv:

IMG_5399 by Geckoo76 on Flickr.

Good grief…is that a claymore??  *blink*  Not being a weapon scholar, how do you carry a sword that is taller than you are?  Don’t you dare tell me ‘very carefully’, either.  *snort*

***Thank you to David for explaining that it is a replica of a German Zweihander!
For cutting into ranks of dudes holding pikes.

The average two-hander Highland claymore (there was a Lowland version too) was about a foot shorter than the average Zweihänder, and had a typical straight-armed crossguard sloping pointwards and ending in a quatrefoil…

I photographed this case of typical Zweihänders in Basel Historisches Museum a few years ago - typical very wide straight or curved guards, sometimes with side-rings, and those distinctive secondary guards (Parierhaken - “parrying hooks”) on the blade…

The men who used these were called Doppelsöldner (“double-pay men”), which they got supposedly for the dangerous duty of fighting in the front rank against opposing pikes, meaning something like this…

The costumes and helmets suggest these are re-enactors of Thirty Years’ or English Civil War, meaning about 80-odd years after Zweihänders were common, but it gives an idea of why double pay was an incentive. I think they earned it!

However, they may also have got “special skills” double pay once they proved they could handle the big two-handers correctly and not cause blue-on-blue incidents like: “Oops, sorry Franz, were those your fingers/kidneys/entrails? Hey, this thing’s longer than it looks…

Looking at Renaissance fight manuals (Marozzo, Meyer, di Grassi etc.,) the technique seems not just longsword, but also partly short polearm (something echoed in the way they were carried) which suggests using really big two-handers was a more complicated business than just “hold the safe end and hit the enemy with the sharp end.”

Neither they nor claymores were ever worn on a back-scabbard. I did a Google Image search for that obscure object of desire: modern and/or movie, every single one. No period back-scabbard is displayed in a museum, and nor does any period art show one in use, because the back-scabbard is a modern Renfair/Hollywood fantasy that didn’t exist before the late 20th century.

A commonly-seen interpretation of back-carried “claymore” is the Irish Gallowglass. Google-image that and you’ll find artwork, illustrations, figurines, war-gaming figures and even otherwise-careful re-enactors (guys, please!) with back-slung scabbards. The trouble is, they all seem based on nothing further back in history than this 1980s or 1990s painting by Angus McBride for one of the Osprey series…

…and since I don’t have the book, I don’t know where he or its author based their data for the scabbard. I’m pretty sure the rest came from this 1521 drawing by Albrecht Dürer of a real Gallowglass and his kern retainers. 

The great big sword is very much there, but any sort of back-scabbard is very much not. If anyone anywhere can find solid 500-year-old evidence that such a specialised item existed, I’ll be impressed, and more than a bit surprised. It hasn’t happened yet.

Period art…

..shows…

…Zweihänders…

…carried…

…like…

…this…

Some surprisingly long swords were carried slung from the waist (including Elizabethan rapiers so long that a law was passed to restrict their length) but to date, evidence for slinging any European sword across the wearer’s back stays in the file marked hic sunt dracones

(via tunnaa-unnaa)

Tags: prah